Tag Archives: cabin

Monday’s Modern | The Cabin

23fa15c08a0442ee3199ab6bb9053827Perhaps Monday is not the best day to talk about escaping into nature, but the weekend got me thinking about it. What is more natural given the beautiful environment we live here in Asheville? Today’s modern cabin has lost it’s Lincoln Log look and has evolved in every direction under the tree filtered sun. We’ve long been collecting architectural inspiration at Modern Asheville on our Pinterest page. So, relax and go here and slip quietly into cabin dreamland. Cheers!2c27ae479c6d4eca7bf8305a5e42550e

Samsel’s Old Fort Cabin | 2nd in Reader’s Choice Award

Old Fort CompOne of Samsel Architects recently constructed modern cabins was voted 2nd in the Reader’s Choice Award with Fine Homebuilding Magazine. The home designed as a fly-fishing escape for clients was located to take advantage of the nearby creek in Old Fort. To see more of the entries go here. Congrats to Duncan and team, along with Alchemy Design. Cheers! Kelly and Troy

Samsel’s Old Fort Cabin | 2nd in Reader’s Choice Award

Old Fort CompOne of Samsel Architects recently constructed modern cabins was voted 2nd in the Reader’s Choice Award with Fine Homebuilding Magazine. The home designed as a fly-fishing escape for clients was located to take advantage of the nearby creek in Old Fort. To see more, and most importantly to vote, go here. Congrats to Duncan and team, along with Alchemy Design. Cheers! Kelly and Troy

Contemporary Cabin

A Minimal Home for a Local Architect

Southern Living Magazine published the design and plans of this home designed by local architect William O. Moore.  The house was originally constructed for him and his wife on North Griffing Blvd. in 1973 and was constructed for $42,000. Following, publication he sold plans to many others who wanted to create this simple living space for themselves. The home showcases one of his signature design features of a dominate roof. He told me, “Roofs are traditionally cheaper to maintain and replace.” So he dedicates maximum square footage to the roof in containing interior spaces.

More information on the history and designs of Bill Moore coming in the future.

The “Cabane”

A peaceful “cabin” out in the woods for a young couple’s primary residence.

Tom Virant and his wife, Yumiko, recently completed this minimalist home for their friends in the woods of Virginia.  The open, light and airy structure meshes perfectly with the site, blurring the line between inside and outside.  The Asheville based architect design + build team, Virant Design, started the design process on this home in October of 2009.

One of the specific requirements was to keep the footprint small and to have no basement.  Their friends wanted to make sure they had no room to collect useless stuff and keep life to a minimum.  The result is this 24′ x 24′ x 24′ cube standing in the middle of four wooded acres.  The house is 980 sq/ft and has 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths and a roof deck.  The house was specifically designed for two people with the goal of feeling like they were living outside.  The design process included Tom and Yumiko doing shade studies to site the house for passive solar gain which influenced window placement and tree selection in relationship to the site.

Originally, Virant Design was hired to only design the house.  However, one of the owners wanted to help construct the house and most local contractors would not allow that.  The Virants agreed to temporarily move up to the site and help build the house themselves.  Tom and Yumiko drove up with their Airstream in January of this year to get started.  The harsh winter prevented them from getting a good start until late March.  In just several months the house was completed in October for a cost of approximately $150,000 including site preparation and septic.

The property sits in a unique, eco-development called The Quarries.  An architect out of Charlottesville originally started the project on the site of an old soapstone quarry.  The goal was to reclaim once industrial land and turn it into a sustainable development with eco-friendly home-building practices, as well as promoting a sense of community through common walking trails, recreational quarries, and common lands.

Text by Troy Winterrowd, Photos by Virant Design