Tag Archives: crafts

UnCommon Market | Saturday + Sunday

Summertime is the perfect time for an INDOOR Uncommon Market! Visit Asheville’s Largest Market for the Old, the Bold, the Creative and Unexpected! Uncommon Market gathers quality curators of antiques, craft, vintage decor, objects, art, jewelry, and home furnishings! Come see what UNCOMMON treasure you’ll find! Go HERE for details or see below. Cheers!

Details:
• Saturday 9AM-5PM and Sunday 10AM–4PM
• $5 Admission (Good for Both Days)
• Kids are FREE!!!
• Service dogs only

River Arts District | Fall Studio Stroll

November 14-15 from 10am to 5pm

12191897_10153732084796532_4698471145216248792_nThe Artists of Asheville’s River Arts District open their doors for a full weekend in the Fall Studio Stroll, welcoming the public to see and collect amazing art in their studios and galleries.

Getting to the River Arts District is easy (Here’s a map!). Take advantage of ample parking and hop aboard one of our free trolleys running throughout the Studio Stroll Weekend. The River Arts District consists of a vast array of artists and working studios in 22 former factories and historical buildings nestled along the French Broad River.

The_River_Arts_District_Association_Inc_footer2_local_flavor_avl_visit_explore_arts_ashevilleMore than 180 working studios, many with showrooms and galleries, are open every day, all year round. Our Artists work in paint, pencil, pottery, metal, fiber, glass, wax, paper and more. Come be inspired, shop, meet the artists and watch live demonstrations!

MA | Design is Human 2016

MA comp 01Hi Folks! Preparations are beginning for 2016 Design is Human week which has grown into events from May 29th thru June 7th. Modern Asheville has been working to sponsor the event here in Asheville along with the Modern Atlanta team. Currently, there is a call for vendor and exhibitorMA Mini 2015 submissions for the Design Expo for emerging and established modern designers and crafts people. Interested in participating? Go here. Also, we are starting to gather local submissions for the Modern Home Tour taking place in Asheville on May 30th + 31st. Architects, Designers, Builders and Homeowners can go here for submission requirements and general information or reach out to Kelly and myself for assistance. We can’t wait for our 3rd year of participation. Cheers!Screen Shot 2015-11-11 at 6.49.59 AM

COTTON MILL STUDIOS | Open House Tonight

-1Stop by and see all our friends at the Cotton Mill Studios tonight. See you there!

WNC Design Guide | Launch Event

WNCModern Asheville was represented by Kelly last evening at the opening event for the WNC Design Guide. The event took place at the Cliffs Country Club with artists, designers and patrons attending. The WNC Design Guide aspires to be your source for handcrafted fine craft and art for elegant mountain living in Western North Carolina. Curious to know more? Click here. Cheers to them!WNC Art

DWELL | Akira Satake

Screen Shot 2015-04-11 at 7.52.56 AMAsheville has been represented in DWELL a few times of late. Today, in this look at design across the states, Akira’s hand-crafted bowls were featured. But don’t just stop there — take the full tour as a good overview and reminder of what good design brings to our lives. Cheers!

Blackberg Creative Studios | Grand Opening

Our friend and client, textile designer Sally Coles, let us know that Blackberg Creative Studios is having their Grand Opening this Friday from 5 to 7 pm. Sally’s work will be featured. The studio is located at 120 Coxe Ave. Blackberg Creative

We hope to see you there. For more on Sally visit her facebook page. Cheers! Kelly and Troy

Shelter Pop-Up at CCC

Main After a busy day of Real Estate, Kelly and I managed to stop by the CCC to visit the opening of Shelter’s Collective Holiday Pop-Up Shop. With Gee’s Bend quilts as a backdrop the Collective brought in some of their favorite artisan wares such as home goods, apothecary items, apparel, ceramics, bags, textiles and gifts from some of their favorite US designers. It is worth a stop before the holidays. Cheers! TroyShelter Comp

Metal and Thread | Opening Soon

metal and threadKelly and I stopped by to visit with Denise and Derek to see how their new space is coming along in the Cotton Mill Studios. Though not ready for business yet they anticipate a June opening. We will keep you posted and look forward to seeing you at the opening. In the meantime visit their website. Cheers! Troy

Charles Counts (1934-2000)

I’m a big fan of Charles Counts craftwork. I first wrote about him a few years back following an exhibit of his work. Since then I get daily hits on him as there is little published on him. I thought I would share this again as his work maintains a modern quality today. Enjoy! Troy

“Art is a disease.  There is no cure for it.”

Comp 1

Bottle & Cups (1957)

This quote sums up the life of Charles counts.  Art “infected” Charles as a school boy in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and became his way of life.  He was the epitome of the Renaissance man, practicing various disciplines such as quilting, weaving, rug hooking, drawing, painting, philosophy, poetry and intellectual thinking.  However, he became most well-known for his pottery and teaching.  Counts worked hard to be a part of the Appallacian heritage of craftsmen who made objects by hand.

Counts - words

Hear Here Words (1984)

Charles Count studied at various places including Berea College and Southern Illinois University at Carondale where he acquired an MFA in Ceramics and Weaving.  Charles apprenticed for Marguerite Wildenhain, a professor who studied at the Bauhaus School of Design in Germany.  It was under her tutelage, Counts learned that art and craft are really two halves to a whole, that craft is the origination of any art from, and functionality of the object and simple design are the goal of any true artist.   Counts also learned that an artist must master the fundamental elements of shape and form before being creative and that there is a spiritual connection between an artist and nature.

Growth Quilt (1977) – Rug (1984) – Quilt (1965)

After training Counts moved back to Tennessee to open his first studio near Knoxville between 1958 and 1962.  Counts found inspiration and strength in the flora and fauna of the natural world.  Repeated natural motifs in his work such as trees, mountains and the sun reflect his belief of something spiritual in nature and in all things that grow.

bowl

Space and Time (1984)

Since 1956, Charles counts was a member and avid supporter of the Southern Highland Craft Guild whose mission it is to keep alive the Appalachian tradition of making traditional and contemporary arts and crafts by hand.  His legacy resides in the hundreds of students he taught and influenced.  The admiration he felt when he first saw the hand work of the mountain potters of Kentucky, Georgia and North Carolina continued to propel him through life, challenging him always to make a better pot than the last one.

Footed Covered Jar (1976) – Jar (1976) – Who Am I, Who Am Eye (1984)

Information on Charles Counts courtesy of Southern Highland Craft Guild

Champagne and Chinet

Black Mountain College Museum and
Art Center fundraiser

Art, champagne, the sound of a gavel, and the shout of “SOLD!” made for a fun and lively summer evening at the Young Men’s Institute (YMI), a historic Asheville landmark.  It was the annual Black Mountain College Museum + Art Center (BMCM+AC) “Food for Thought”

Entering the YMI, we greeted a few friends including Alice Sebrell, Director of the BMCM+AC, and quickly made our way to the freely flowing champagne bar, reviewed the auction items and planned our bidding strategy.  We knew competition was going to be tough as the lots were beautiful ceramic plates and platters designed and decorated by some of Western North Carolina’s nationally and internationally recognized contemporary artists including Taiyo la Paix, Donald Sultan, Marcia Cohen, and Alli Good.  Each plate featured a quote from a Black Mountain College poet, painter, philosopher, architect or scientist and were interpreted by the participating artists.

Alli Good + Marcia Cohen + Taiyo La Paix

The auction began promptly at 8:45 with 30 ceramic art pieces to be sold in support of the BMCM+AC.  Our competitive instincts had to kick in as the  plates were being sold between blinks and sips of champagne.  The highest price bid was $625.00 for Kathy Triplett’s “The doors keep rattling – Denise Levertov” in a dramatic bidding war across the auditorium ending in cheers and hugs.  The average bid price was $275.00.  Alas, we just missed winning Donald Sultan’s “Hot Dog Hot Dog” at $425.00.

The evening came to a close with a very special treat – Visual artist Mel Chin entertaining us with a conceptual performance piece.  Chin’s piece grew out of the combination of his time constraint, ethnicity, and theme for the evening…the use of plates to convey a former Black Mountain School artist’s quote.  Chin’s work typically focusses on environmental, cultural or social circumstances in an effort to bring light to our place in this world.  For Saturday night’s performance, Chin used lighthearted humor to highlight each poem.  Being of Chinese decent, he selected 4 Chinet  paper dinner plates as his medium, (get the play on words here?);  with one imprinted with maggots, one with a gingerbread man, one modified as a yellow mask, and one, a plate with the bite taken out of it highlighting the bitterness of the process and the referenced poem.

Brigid Burns + Donald Sultan

The bidding ended on a high note – one lucky participant walked home with a unique time capsule of a piece created  by an internationally recognized conceptual artist preserving the legacy of an important American cultural institution; Black Mountain College.  The richness of all the artist’s contributions and the benevolence of the bidders made for a fantastic evening.

Article written by Cameron Campbell and Photos courtesy of Black Mountain College Museum + Art Center

Charles Counts (1934-2000)

“Art is a disease.  There is no cure for it.”

Bottle and Cups (1957)

This quote sums up the life of Charles counts.  Art “infected” Charles as a school boy in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and became his way of life.  He was the epitome of the Renaissance man, practicing various desciplines such as quilting, weaving, rug hooking, drawing, painting, philosophy, poetry and intellectual thinking.  However, he became most well known for his pottery and teaching.  Counts worked hard to be a part of the Appallacian heritage of craftsmen who made objects by hand.

Hear Here Words (1984)

Charles Count studied at various places including Berea College and Southern Illinois University at Carondale where he acquired an MFA in Ceramics and Weaving.  Charles apprenticed for Marguerite Wildenhain, a professor who studied at the Bauhaus School of Design in Germany.  It was under her tutelage, Counts learned that art and craft are really two halves to a whole, that craft is the origination of any art from, and functionality of the object and simple design are the goal of any true artist.   Counts also learned that an artist must master the fundamental elements of shape and form before being creative and that there is a spiritual connection between an artist and nature.

Growth Quilt (1977) - Rug (1984) - Quilt (1965)

After training Counts moved back to Tennessee to open his first studio near Knoxville between 1958 and 1962.  Counts found inspiration and strength in the flora and fauna of the natural world.  Repeated natural motifs in his work such as trees, mountains and the sun reflect his belief of something spiritual in nature and in all things that grow.

Space and Time (1984)

Since 1956, Charles counts was a member and avid supporter of the Southern Highland Craft Guild whose mission it is to keep alive the Appalachian tradition of making traditional and contemporary arts and crafts by hand.  His legacy resides in the hundreds of students he taught and influenced.  The admiration he felt when he first saw the hand work of the mountain potters of Kentucky, Georgia and North Carolina continued to propel him through life, challenging him always to make a better pot than the last one.

Footed Covered Jar (1976) - Jar (1976) - Who Am I, Who Am Eye (1984)

Information on Charles Counts courtesy of Southern Highland Craft Guild