Tag Archives: maria rusafova

What is Modernism for our Mountains?

Join Modern Asheville, AIA and a few of our designer friends on the evening of Thursday, June 16th for an architectural panel discussion on Modernism and mindful, modern design practice in our mountains at the Black Mountain College Museum. Architects Maria Rusafova, Mark Allison and Thad Rhoden will be moderated by enthusiast Troy Winterrowd. The discussion will be followed by our last Modern Mixer social gathering before our summer break. We hope to see you there. And please — don’t forget to vote today. Cheers!13310455_1008433319234141_7570262326683399378_n

 

Welcome Home | Maria and Jakub

1798054_10204954293710401_1624038221909042793_nKelly and I are happy to have Maria and Jakub back in town and ready to start practicing architecture here again. Maria, Jakub and family have been traveling the globe for two years and recently landed back. We wanted to take the opportunity to re-introduce them to our growing Modern Asheville audience so I’m going to republish a past article I wrote with Maria a few years back. Enjoy it and cheers to them!

Defining a Modern Asheville Aesthetic – published 1/2/2014

I recently sat down with architect Maria Rusafova at her home in West Asheville. She is the first architect to respond to my formal request to define the qualities of a Western North Carolina modern design. However, the original idea and inspiration came from lengthy discussions with my friend and architect Brandon Pass. No doubt I will be discussing this with him soon.

Maria Comp

Maria and her husband have been in Asheville since 2000 following her graduating from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Her brother lived here and – well — who can resist? Asheville worked given that Maria states she is drawn to modern, site sensitive and environmentally conscious designs. She, also, loves the creative challenge of designing aroundbeka1 tight budgets. How often do we hear that? Given the rich results of her own home and the client project she just finished in 5 Points neighborhood she definitely knows how to wrangle a lot – from minimal means. As you know, that always speaks to us at Modern Asheville.

Before I delve further into my discussion with Maria, let me remind you that my goal is not to define what modern is to WNC in black and white, but to note some common influences. Most of us, without being able to describe it, can intuitively feel when a modern building works within its context and doesn’t. The natural and organic design integrity creates a harmony that is almost timeless. In opposition, I’ve seen some out-of-state builders propose stucco and aluminum homes that capture a trendy modern aesthetic that is neither contextual nor timeless.

Back to Maria.

Big6Geographically, Maria, as most architects, has rarely seen a flat site here. Most are sloped and challenging. However, the challenges can offer useful layering of functions and separations from public to private or living to utilitarian.

Materials – there are many natural materials readily available here from stone, wood and metal that reflect our local geography and help to create a continuum with the natural world.

Maria Vernac Comp

When it comes to vernacular influences Maria is infatuated with both barn structures of our rural landscape and some of the simple, narrow and upright homes of our historic neighborhoods. There is calmness in breaking down a residential structure to a simple polygon, as opposed to, a myriad of roof lines. Big3Again, less is more. There is richness and freedom in something that is easy to identify.

Culturally, people are moving here for sense of community. A home no longer defines ones life, but something that steps back to offer the freedom to live other aspects of your life in a broader sense. So, freedom from financial constraints and maintenance are important to living the life we all want here — perhaps aBig12n extra dinner at the Admiral or time to hike the Blue Ridge with friends?

For me, Maria blends her understanding of context with her European sense of simplicity and efficiency. It is an appropriate blend that allows her to capture the nuances of locality while bringing a lightness to living appropriate for today. One can see this in the plans for her own home.

B14Maria was recently chosen by one of our real estate clients to help sensibly steward the updating needed to their original Bert King home. We will explore more on that and one of her other upcoming projects soon.

In the meantime explore more of their work here. Cheers!

2015 Matsumoto Prize | Asheville Award Winner

IMG_1849_2Kelly and I drove to Raleigh yesterday afternoon for our yearly trek to NC Modernist Houses residential architectural awards event. Last year, out of six state prizes given, we had two local winners. We accepted the award for Maria Rusafova’s Blue House here in the Five Points neighborhood of Asheville while she travels the globe.21 St Charles Pl Asheville NC-small-002-Front-666x443-72dpi

This year local designer David Way of Roost was voted 2nd Place in the People’s Choice Awards for his 5th Peregrine home in Lakeview Park. {Yeah!} If you don’t recall the details of the home take the tour here. The 2000 sqft, one level home has an equal amount of outdoor living space to maximize your Asheville living experience. Congrats to David and the Erbs for their second award on this cool, modern home!

Thanks George and team for putting this event together. Architects and Builders — let’s get some more entries in next year and showcase our great talent here in Asheville. Kelly and I may just hire a bus to take us all there!

 

Modern Home | Drive-By Shot

IMG_0225Yesterday, while stopping in to visit one of our clients who just finished renovating their mid-century home, Kelly and Chett snapped this pic in Chunns Cove of a newer, modern construction in the area. The 2000 sqft residence had been designed by Rusafova | Markulis Architects and was completed in the Fall of 2013. Below is what the design team says about the home. B1

Our clients came to us with defined modern aesthetics and flair for European design. They requested lots of glass, natural ventilation, airy open spaces and connection between inside and outside. We organized their program in a composition of simple volumes that work with the steep site to make the most of the beautiful forest around. The living room, dining room and master suite feature direct access to a courtyard terrace to the East and a cantilevered deck to the West. Guest bedrooms, media room and workout room are located on the lower level. The simplicity of the floor plan organization creates open and warm interior environment. The exterior material palette is minimal and restrained. Stained cypress wood, painted cementitious siding, masonry unit site walls, and a hovering shed roof planes ground the house into the landscape.B25

As always we are big fans of the teams work. Cheers!

North Carolina Modernist Houses | Matsumoto Prize Event

Troy and Kelly with George Smart of NCMH.

Troy and Kelly with George Smart of NCMH.

Kelly and I traveled to Raleigh yesterday afternoon to attend North Carolina Modernist Houses’ Matsumoto Prize event for modern homes in North Carolina Compat CAM. Two homes in Asheville were awarded 2nd and 3rd prize. Maria Rusafova won 3rd place for her Blue House in Five Points (more to come on that) and SPG Architects won for the Herbits House in Leicester. Kelly and I were able to accept Maria’s award on her behalf as she tour’s India with her family. Congrats to our local winners!IMG_5782

Kelly and I had a great time and made a bit of a scene — of course. Also, we are talking to George about an event we are planning here in Asheville for this upcoming winter. More soon. Cheers! Troy

Rusafova Markulis Architects | the Blue House

1The Blue House in Five Points is up for the George Matsumoto Prize from North Carolina Modernist Houses. With the recent additions of Trader Joes and Harris Teeter the burgeoning and highly walk-able Five Points neighborhood has become home to new infill construction including to this simple and clever home by a couple of my favorite architects Maria Rosafova and Jakub Markulis of Rusafova Markulis Architects.

The Blue House was designed for a young family that wanted a small, energy efficient and affordable house to call home. Their building site presented the architect with numerous challenges and site constraints. An existing sewer easement cut diagonally through the site, leaving a small trapezoid area to build on. In order to maximize the square footage they designed a vertical, tree house structure elevated from the ground in order not to disturb the roots of the two mature trees that they wanted to preseBlue House Comprve. Inspired by Japanese aesthetics the clients opted for clean lines, simple yet visually striking shape and open floor plan that provides visual continuity between inside and outside. The modest construction budget dictated the off-the-shelf choice of materials. The architects kept a simple palette of finishes adding visual interest through the us of bold colors and warm plywood walls.

If you would like to see the other homes in the competition and vote click here.

NC Modernist Houses | the George Matsumoto Prize

Hi Folks. Check out the entries for this year’s Matsumoto prize. Asheville has one local architect entered this year and two homes. To view all the entries and vote for your favorite click here. Cheers! TroyMatsu

The George Matsumoto Prize is a unique design competition focusing on Modernist houses in North Carolina and featuring $6,000 in awards, a blue-ribbon jury of internationally-known award-winning architects, and an online People’s Choice vote. In 2012, NCMH created the Matsumoto Prize in honor of George Matsumoto FAIA. Matsumoto was one of the founding faculty members of the NCSU School of Design who created some of North Carolina’s most well-known and well-loved Modernist houses.

The Matsumoto Prize powerfully engages the public in the value of architecture and demonstrates the unique talent of exceptional Modernist architects and designers in North Carolina.

Architect Maria Rusafova

Defining a Modern Asheville Aesthetic

I recently sat down with architect Maria Rusafova at her home in West Asheville. She is the first architect to respond to my formal request to define the qualities of a Western North Carolina modern design. However, the original idea and inspiration came from lengthy discussions with my friend and architect Brandon Pass. No doubt I will be discussing this with him soon.

Maria Comp

Maria and her husband have been in Asheville since 2000 following her graduating from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Her brother lived here and – well — who can resist? Asheville worked given that Maria states she is drawn to modern, site sensitive and environmentally conscious designs. She, also, loves the creative challenge of designing aroundbeka1 tight budgets. How often do we hear that? Given the rich results of her own home and the client project she just finished in 5 Points neighborhood she definitely knows how to wrangle a lot – from minimal means. As you know, that always speaks to me.

Before I delve further into my discussion with Maria, let me remind you that my goal is not to define what modern is to WNC in black and white, but to note some common influences. Most of us, without being able to describe it, can intuitively feel when a modern building works within its context and doesn’t. The natural and organic design integrity creates a harmony that is almost timeless. In opposition, I’ve seen some out-of-state builders propose stucco and aluminum homes that capture a trendy modern aesthetic that is neither contextual nor timeless.

Back to Maria.

Big6Geographically, Maria, as most architects, has rarely seen a flat site here. Most are sloped and challenging. However, the challenges can offer useful layering of functions and separations from public to private or living to utilitarian.

Materials – there are many natural materials readily available here from stone, wood and metal that reflect our local geography and help to create a continuum with the natural world.

Maria Vernac Comp

When it comes to vernacular influences Maria is infatuated with both barn structures of our rural landscape and some of the simple, narrow and upright homes of our historic neighborhoods. There is calmness in breaking down a residential structure to a simple polygon, as opposed to, a myriad of roof lines. Big3Again, less is more. There is richness and freedom in something that is easy to identify.

Culturally, people are moving here for sense of community. A home no longer defines ones life, but something that steps back to offer the freedom to live other aspects of your life in a broader sense. So, freedom from financial constraints and maintenance are important to living the life we all want here — perhaps aBig12n extra dinner at the Admiral or time to hike the Blue Ridge with friends?

For me, Maria blends her understanding of context with her European sense of simplicity and efficiency. It is an appropriate blend that allows her to capture the nuances of locality while bringing a lightness to living appropriate for today. One can see this in the plans for her own home.

B14Maria was recently chosen by one of our real estate clients to help sensibly steward the updating needed to their original Bert King home. We will explore more on that and one of her other upcoming projects soon.

Cheers!

Troy