Tag Archives: mies van der rohe

the Asheville House | Opening Night

IMG_5944The mid-century planets aligned this week conjuring up two new furniture stores. Last night Kelly, Chett and I were invited to the Grand Opening of the Asheville House in Black Mountain. With the growing interest in modern, retailers Charlotte and Lincoln Walters decided to launch their mid-century styled new home furnishings store in a beautifully restored carriage house in downtown. They describe the electric mix as representative of Asheville where rustic meets refined and organic meets industrial.

The three of us bumped into Robert from Splurge who provided a few of his visionary light fixtures for the retailer. None of us won the Mies van der Rohe chair they were raffling off with proceeds supporting the Black Mountain Center for the Arts. Still, it was a fun night and gave us the opportunity to catch up with some clients in our sister city to the East. Make sure you go soon. Cheers! Troy

Comp

Echoes of Mies Van Der Rohe

In light of the announcement that the BB&T building will be repurposed and remodeled, I thought it would be appropriate to pull this article out of the archives. In the attached video, local architect Mark Allison gives context to the buildings architecture in relationship to both other cities and Asheville itself. Enjoy!

A Commentary on the BB&T Building in downtown Asheville.  

north-west-bank-1965Local Architect Mark Allison was generous enough to send me his new video commentary on the BB&T Building. Enjoy this interesting history into the architectural influences of Mies Van Der Rohe.

The BB&T Building was completed in 1965 as the headquarters for North Western Bank.  It is 18 stories, was built by George Goodyear and designed by D. Gene Whittington.

The BB&T building reflects the International style of Mies Van Der Rohe.  Mies’s thirty years as an American architect reflect a more structural, pure approach towards achieving his goal of a new architecture for the 20th Century.  He focused his efforts on the idea of enclosing open and adaptable spaces with clearly arranged structural frameworks, featuring pre-manufactured steel shapes infilled with large sheets of glass.  His early projects at the IIT campus and for developer Herb Greenwald opened the eyes of Amercians to a style that seemed a natural progression of the almost forgotten 19th century Chicago School style.   His architecture with origins in the German Bauhaus and western European International Style became an accepted mode of building for American cultural and educational institutions, developers, public agencies, and large corporations.

The BB&T building does not live up to some key design principles of Mies as Mark will point out in his video.

Thank you Mark.

Photo courtesy of the Pack Memorial Library

The Echoes of Mies Van Der Rohe

A Commentary on the BB&T Building in downtown Asheville.  

north-west-bank-1965Local Architect Mark Allison was generous enough to send me his new video commentary on the BB&T Building. Enjoy this interesting history into the architectural influences of Mies Van Der Rohe.  Copy the link at the bottom of this post into your address bar.

The BB&T Building was completed in 1965 as the headquarters for North Western Bank.  It is 18 stories, was built by George Goodyear and designed by D. Gene Whittington.  

The BB&T building reflects the International style of Mies Van Der Rohe.  Mies’s thirty years as an American architect reflect a more structural, pure approach towards achieving his goal of a new architecture for the 20th Century.  He focused his efforts on the idea of enclosing open and adaptable spaces with clearly arranged structural frameworks, featuring pre-manufactured steel shapes infilled with large sheets of glass.  His early projects at the IIT campus and for developer Herb Greenwald opened the eyes of Amercians to a style that seemed a natural progression of the almost forgotten 19th century Chicago School style.   His architecture with origins in the German Bauhaus and western European International Style became an accepted mode of building for American cultural and educational institutions, developers, public agencies, and large corporations.  

The BB&T building does not live up to some key design principles of Mies as Mark will point out in his video.  

Thanks Mark!

(text by Troy Winterrowd, photo courtesy of the Pack Memorial Library)